Civil War Veterans of Highland Park

           These Civil War veterans either came from or subsequently lived in Highland Park. Several soldiers fought in regiments that were part of the same brigade, such as the 42nd and 51st regiments.  Several fought in the same regiment, for example Edward Bartlett and Frederick Richards in the 17th cavalry, Stephen Kline and John Mooney in the 20th infantry, and Thomas Moroney, David O’Brien, and Edward Whalen in the 89th infantry.   For details of the battles, information has been taken from Illinois in the Civil War by Victor Hicken.  Other sources of information are generally cited in the text. 

            It is estimated that between 600,000-620,000 men died in the Civil War.  This was 2% of the entire population of the United States in 1860.  Based on the 2000 census of the United States, 2% of the population would be more than 5.6 million men. 

 

Appleton, Isaac

           Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax lists a “Mr. Appleton” among the Civil War veterans living in Highland Park at the time they enlisted.   

            The Index to the 1862 Military Census for Lake County, Illinois lists an Isaac Appleton who resided in Deerfield Township at the time.  The index states that he was 20 years old, born in Maine, and was a soldier in the 22nd Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers. The Roster of Wisconsin Volunteers, War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865 does not list Isaac Appleton in any of the companies of the 22ndRegiment.  The 1870 U.S. census for Cook County, Illinois lists an Isaac B. Appleton living in Chicago, age 25, born in Maine. 

            The 22nd was organized at Racine, Wis., and mustered in September 2, 1862. It was attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Army of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to November, 1862; 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Army of Kentucky, to February, 1863; Coburn's Brigade, Baird's Division, Army of Kentucky, Dept. of the Cumberland, to June, 1863; 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1863; Coburn's Unattached Brigade, Dept. of the Cumberland, to December, 1863; Post of Murfreesboro, District of Nashville, Dept. of the Cumberland, to January, 1864; 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to April, 1864; and 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1865.

            The regiment took part in the battle of Thompson's Station, March 4-5, 1863 (where nearly 200 of the regiment were captured by Confederate General Bragg's Cavalry forces). It saw action at Little Harpeth, Brentwood, Tenn., March 25, 1863 where it was surrounded and surrendered to Brig. General Nathan Bedford Forrest.  Prisoners were exchanged on May 5, 1863.   The regiment took part in the Atlanta (Ga.) campaign, May 1 to September 8, 1864 and saw action in the battle of Resaca , May 14-15, New Hope Church, May 25 and in operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain, June 10-July 2, including the assault on Kenesaw, June 27.   The 22nd Wis. participated in the siege of Atlanta, July 22-August 25, and in the occupation of Atlanta, September 2-November 15.  It joined General Sherman’s march to the sea through Georgia, November 15-December 10 and fought in the campaign of the Carolinas, January to April 1865. The regiment’s final battle of the war was the battle of Bennett's House April 26, 1865 where it witnessed the surrender of Johnston and his army.  The 22nd marched to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19, and participated in the Grand Review on May 24.  The regiment mustered out June 12, 1865.

 

Baker, Henry

          Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax states “Now living in Minneapolis, Kansas; Henry Baker, enlisted in Board of Trade Battery in 1864.”   The Chicago Board of Trade Battery, Illinois Light Artillery was attached to the 2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to October 1864 and the 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to June 1865.  The Battery took part in the Atlanta campaign in the spring and summer of 1864 and saw action at the battles of Franklin and Nashville at the end of that year.

            The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database notes that Pvt. Baker was 18 years old when he enlisted, 5’8” tall, had brown hair, blue eyes, and a light complexion.  His occupation was listed as farmer and his birthplace, Illinois.  His service record indicates that he joined on January 4, 1864 and mustered in on January 31, 1864 in Chicago.  He mustered out on June 30, 1865.

 

Baker, Peter

          Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax lists “Peter Baker, joined Merril’s Ind. Horse Brigade in 1861.  Mustered out in 1864, reenlisted and served until the end.”  Library staff believes that “Merril’s Ind. Horse Brigade” was the 2ndRegiment, Missouri Cavalry (Merrill’s Horse).  This unit was organized at Benton Barracks, Missouri by Captain Lewis Merrill, U.S.A., under the authority of General Fremont from September 3 – December 11, 1861.  The regiment was engaged in Missouri and Arkansas during most of the war.  During the final months of the war, the regiment operated in Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama.

            The Index to the 1862 Military Census for Lake County, Illinois lists Peter Baker living in Deerfield Township.  According to that census, he was 24 years old, born in Germany, was engaged in farming and was not in military service at that time.

            According to the Database of Illinois Civil War Veterans of Missouri Units, Pvt. Peter Baker served in Co. A, 2nd Regiment, Missouri Cavalry.  His residence was listed as Port Clinton, Illinois.

            At the time of her publication in 1920, Mrs. Truax added that Peter Baker was “now living in Minneapolis, Kansas.”

           

Bartlett, Edward

            Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax lists “Edward Bartlett” among the Civil War veterans living in Highland Park at the time they enlisted.

            There are several listings for Edward P. Bartlett in the Database of Illinois Civil War Veterans.  These listings indicate that Mr. Bartlett’s residence was Lake Forest and that he served with Cos. A & I, 17th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry.  According to the Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois: Containing Reports for the Years 1861-66, Mr. Bartlett was recruited on March 26, 1864 and mustered in on April 21, 1864.  The Past and Present in Lake County, Illinois  (Chicago: Wm Le Baron & Co, 1877) states that Captain Edward P. Bartlett enlisted as Quarter Master Sergt. in Co. A, was promoted to Second Lieut. on November 17, 1864, to First Lieut. on July 11, 1865, and to Captain on December 5, 1865.  He mustered out on December 15, 1865.

            The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database notes that 19 year old Edward P. Bartlett enlisted for a three month period in Co. C, 70th Regiment Illinois Infantry on June 6, 1862.  He mustered in on July 4, 1862 at Camp Butler, Illinois.  At age 21, he enlisted as Quarter Master Sergeant in the Headquarters Co., 17th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry.  He was promoted to Second Lieutenant, Co. A., 17th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry on January 23, 1864, and was promoted to First Lieutenant of the same company on July 20, 1865.  He mustered out on December 15, 1865.  He was commissioned Captain but was not mustered.

           The 17th Cav. was organized at St. Charles and mustered in January 28, 1864.  Companies. "A," "B," "C," "D," were ordered to St. Louis in June 1864, and thence to the District of North Missouri.  They were engaged in escort and provost duty at St. Joseph and Weston, Mo., till June 1865.  Other companies of this regiment were stationed in Missouri and took part in several skirmishes during the summer and fall of 1864.

 

Clark, Theodore M.

          A History of Lake County Illinois (Roy S. Bates, 1912) by John J. Halsey states the Mr. Clark served with a Missouri regiment and with the 10th Michigan Cavalry during the Civil War.  Halsey’s History provides the following biographical details.

          “Theodore M. Clark was born at Geneva, Wis., February 25, 1843.  He went early to live in Edwards County, in this State [Illinois]. He enlisted in August, 1861, in a Missouri regiment, was discharged in1862; in 1863 enlisted in the 10th Michigan Cavalry, and was mustered out in November, 1865.  On his return to civil life he engaged in railroading in the west, and there (sic) for a number of years carried on a grain business in Chicago.  In May, 1879, he was married to Miss Sarah A. Middleton.  In 1880 he came to live at Highland Park where he conducts a coal and lumber business.  In 1910 he was elected Supervisor of East Deerfield.  He is the kind of citizen much needed in positions of public trust.”

           According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, Mr. Clark served as a private in Co. D, Engineer Regiment of the West, Missouri Volunteers.  After his discharge from that regiment, Mr. Clark served as a sergeant inCo. A, 10th Regiment, Michigan Cavalry.  The regiment was organized at Grand Rapids, Mich., September 18 to November 23, 1863. Mustered in November 18, 1863. Left Michigan for Lexington, Ky., December 1, 1863. Attached to District of North Central Kentucky, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. of the Ohio, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to February, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, District of East Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to July, 1865. Cavalry Brigade, District of East Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to November, 1865.

           The regiment saw duty at Lexington, Ky., till January 25, 1864, then moved to Burnside's Point January 14, and duty there till February 25.  It marched from Burnside's Point to Knoxville, Tenn., February 25-March 6. 1864 and saw action throughout Tennessee for the remainder of the spring and summer.  Company A participated in the battle of Blue Springs on August 23.  The regiment participated in the expedition from East Tennessee toward Southwest Virginia September 20-October 17, the battle at Carter's Station September 30- October 1, Thorn Hill, near Bean Station, October 10, Mossy Creek October 15, Sweetwater October 23,  Morristown November 13, Russellsville November 14, Strawberry Plains November 16-17, and Flat Creek November 17. It took part in Stoneman's Raid into Southwest Virginia December 10-29. It saw duty at Knoxville till March 21, 1865 and joined Stoneman's Expedition from East Tennessee into Southwest Virginia and Western North Carolina March 21-April 25 where it participated in numerous engagements.  The regiment concluded its service with duty at Lenoir Station and Sweetwater till August, and in West Tennessee till November. It was mustered out November 11, 1865.

 

Connaughton, Martin

          Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax lists “Martin Conerton” among the Civil War veterans living in Highland Park at the time they enlisted.

            The 1870 U.S. census for Lake County, Illinois lists Martin Conerton, age 36, his wife Mary, and four children, Thomas (8), Mary (4), James (2), and Alice (7 months). 

            Martin Connaughton mustered into Co. G, 15th Regiment Reorganized, Illinois Infantry on March 14, 1865.  The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database notes that he was 32 years old, 5’6” tall, had dark hair and complexion, and gray eyes. His occupation was listed as laborer and his birthplace, Ireland.  He was appointed musician on March 21, 1865 and mustered out on September 16, 1865.  A History of Lake County Illinois (Roy S. Bates, 1912) by John J. Halsey provides a listing of tax-payers and voters of Deerfield Township in 1877.  The listing includes an entry for M. Connaughton, farmer, P.O. Deerfield. 

           An obituary of James Conorton’s wife Cecilia provides family history.  At the time of her death in September 1968, Mrs. Conorton was living in a house built by James at 3140 Western Avenue, Highland Park.  This land was purchased by James Conorton’s grandfather in 1849 to provide stove wood for his nearby farm.  The 10 acre plot became a part of the city of Highland Park in 1923. James Conorton was born in the Port Clinton lighthouse, which his family rented from the government.

 

Danner, John 

            “John Danner” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax.

            Both the Database of Illinois Civil War Veterans and the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database list a John Donner as a private in Co. K, 51st  Regiment, Illinois Infantry.    He was mustered in Oct. 3, 1864 and discharged June 10, 1865 as disabled according to the Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois: Containing Reports for the Years 1861-66.  The 1870 U.S. census for Lake County, Illinois lists John Danner, aged 50 years old, born in France and residing with his wife Ellen (age 45), daughters Ellen (15), Salmy (12), Mary (10), son Albert (4), and mother-in-law, Ellen Ludwig (65). 

            The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database notes that Pvt. Donner was 43 years old when he enlisted, 5’6 ½” tall, had dark hair, blue eyes, and a fair complexion.  His occupation was listed as farmer and his place of birth, France.  He enlisted as a substitute for Matthias Smith and mustered in for a one year term of service on October 3, 1864 at Chicago.  He mustered out on June 10, 1865 at Louisville, Kentucky.

           During Mr. Danner’s service the 51st was attached to the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland.

           Mr. Danner was one of 192 men who joined the regiment on October 18, 1864 at Chattanooga in time to participate in the pursuit of Confederate General Hood into Tennessee after the fall of Atlanta.  Mr. Danner saw action at the battles of Franklin (Nov. 30) and Nashville (Dec. 15-16).  The heavy casualties that were sustained indicate the intensity of these battles.  The battle of Franklin was especially bloody for the 51st.  The regiment lost 1 officer killed, 3 wounded, 52 men killed and wounded and 98 missing.  The regiment mustered out on September 25, 1865 at Camp Irwin, Texas, and arrived at Camp Butler, Ill. on October 15, 1865 for final payment and discharge.

 

Dike, William Wallace

            Mr. Dike’s obituary (Highland Park Press, March 3, 1927) states that he was company clerk in Co. C, 141st Regiment, Illinois Volunteers, serving from May 10th, 1864 to October 13th, 1864, entering Kentucky, but never engaged in action.  The Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois: Containing Reports for the Years 1861-66 states that Mr. Dike enlisted on May 8, 1864, was mustered in June 16, 1864 and mustered out October 10, 1864.  The 141st was one of several “one hundred-day men” regiments. TheReport explains the purpose of these regiments. “Early in the spring of 1864 the government of the Northwestern States, namely: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa, believing that the rebellion was nearing its close, and desiring to aid the Government in every way possible, tendered to the President a volunteer force of 85,000 one hundred-day men, to relieve the veteran soldiers from guard duty at forts, arsenals, prisons, and elsewhere.”

            According to the Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database, William Dike was a private in Co. C, 141st Regiment, Illinois Infantry.  His place of residence was Elgin, Illinois.  He was 19 years old, 5’8 ½” tall, had dark hair, gray eyes, and a light complexion.  He was unmarried.  His occupation was listed as farmer and his place of birth, Algonquin, Illinois.  He enlisted for a 100 day term of service on May 8, 1864 in Elgin and mustered in on June 16, 1864 at Camp Kane, Illinois.  He mustered out on October 10, 1864 at Chicago.

            Mr. Dike was born at Crystal Lake on November 19, 1844.  His parents George W. Dike and Elizabeth Wallace had moved there from Vermont shortly before his birth.  Mr. Dike attended the Todd seminary in Woodstock, Illinois and was attending the Williston academy in Massachusetts when the Civil War intervened and he volunteered his service to the Union army.  The 141st Illinois Volunteers were organized at Elgin, Ill., and mustered in for 100 days from June 16 to Oct. 10, 1864.  The regiment moved to Columbus, Ky., and provided garrison duty in that District till October.  Following his service, Mr. Dike returned to Crystal Lake where he assisted his brothers Charles and Edward on their father’s 400 acre farm.  For a short time, Mr. Dike lived in Battle Creek, Michigan where he met Mary M. Merritt who became his wife on October 26, 1869.  After his wife’s death on August 24, 1914, Mr. Dike moved to Highland Park to make his home with his daughter Mrs. Fred Clow.

 

Drew, George A.

           The National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database lists George Drew as a member of Co. G, 6th Regiment, Michigan Cavalry.  His rank upon entering the service was captain.  He was a major when the regiment was mustered out.  The 6th was organized at Grand Rapids, Mich., May 28 to October 13, 1862 and mustered in October 13, 1862.  The regiment served as a defensive force for Washington, D. C. beginning on December 10, 1862.  It was attached to Provisional Cavalry Brigade, Casey's Division, Military District of Washington, to February, 1863; Provisional Cavalry Brigade, Casey's Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to March, 1863; 1st Brigade, Stahel's Cavalry Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June, 1863; 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps. Army of the Potomac, to March 1864; 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps. Army of the Potomac and Middle Military Division, to June, 1865; District of the Plains, Dept. of Missouri, to September, 1865, and District of Dakota, Dept. of Missouri, to November, 1865.  The regiment mustered out November 24, 1865. 

          The 6th Michigan Cavalry took part in numerous battles in the East.  The list includes Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1-3, 1863; Hagerstown, July 11-13, Culpeper Court House, September 13, Brandy Station, October 11, Manassas Junction, October 15, 1863, the Battles of the Wilderness, May 5-7, 1864, General Sheridan’s raid to the James River, May 9-24, and his Shenandoah Valley campaign, August 7 – November 28, 1864, Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864, and Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865 where General Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia.  The 6th took part in the Grand Review on May 23, 1865.

         Maj. Drew’s obituary  (Highland Park Press, July 28, 1921 - photo) states that he died at his home, 335 Hazel avenue on Thursday, June 21st, in his 91st year.  He was born in Mackinac, Michigan, and entered the service as captain, 6th Mich. Cavalry, in 1862, and served as aide to General Custer.  He took part in 56 battles, under Generals Sheridan and Merritt; receiving brevit as lieutenant-colonel in 1865 for highly distinguished and meritorious service in the campaign against Richmond, Va.  He was present at the surrender.  Major Drew saw brilliant Indian service under General Crook and at the time of the capture of Geronimo.  He and his wife, Fannie Hooper Flint, daughter of General F.F. Flint, had two children, Franklin Flint and Donna Margaret.  Maj. Drew was retired from active service while in the 307 U.S. Cavalry, in 1896, and had made his home in Highland Park since then.  Maj. Drew is buried at the Fort Sheridan cemetery. 

 

Finney, John       

Finney 4-24-08-2.jpg

The Past and Present of Lake County  (1877) lists John Phinney as a private in Company F, 65th Illinois Infantry.  He enlisted for three years on March 10, 1862, re-enlisted as a veteran on March 31, 1864, and was transferred to Company K as consolidated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flint, Franklin Foster

            According to the Portrait and Biographical Album of Lake County, Illinois (Chicago, 1891), Mr. Flint graduated from West Point in 1841 and entered military service.  At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was in command of Ft. Churchill in the Territory of Nevada.  In May 1861, he was promoted to Major of the Sixteenth United States Regulars.  He served with the Army of the Cumberland and Army of the Ohio.  In 1863, he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the Seventh United States Infantry.  He served in the Army until the spring of 1882 when he applied for retirement.

            His obituary (Chicago Daily Tribune, September 17, 1891) includes the following details.

            “Gen. Franklin Foster Flint, a veteran of over forty years’ service in the regular army of the United States, died suddenly at his home in Highland Park Tuesday of apoplexy, aged 71 years. At 1 o’clock Friday afternoon, after short services at the Trinity Episcopal Church, Highland Park, the funeral procession will proceed to the military cemetery at Fort Sheridan, where he will be buried with the military honors due his rank.

            Gen. Flint was born in New Hampshire in 1820.  Some years later his parents moved to Massachusetts, where July 1, 1837, he was appointed as a cadet at West Point. 

            His first active service was in the Florida Indian war in 1841-’42. From there he was sent to frontier service in Indian Territory and was stationed at Fort Towson and Fort Gibson, where he remained until 1846, when he was made Acting Assistant Adjutant General of the Second and Sixth Military Departments, with headquarters at Fort Smith, Arkansas.

            From 1851 to 1854 he was stationed in Minnesota.  He took an active part in suppressing the disturbances in Kansas in 1856-’57, and for the excellent service rendered was given a Captain’s commission.  In 1858 he went out with the Utah expedition and subsequently was ordered to California.

            May 14, 1861, he was made Major of the Sixteenth Infantry. From September 17, 1862 to March 23, 1863, he was acting Inspector General of the Department of Ohio.  Next he was made Chief Commissary of Musters of the Departments of Ohio and Kentucky.  While in this service he was made Lieutenant Colonel of the Seventh Infantry.

            From January 19 to July 20, 1866, Col. Flint was stationed at Tallahassee, Florida.  In October of the same year he was made Assistant Inspector General of the District of Florida.  July 8 he was promoted Colonel of the Fourth Infantry. He was brevetted Brigadier General for faithful and meritorious services during the Civil War.

            April 11, 1882, at his own request he was placed on the retired list. General Flint was a member of the Highland Park City Council for seven years.  He leaves a wife and four daughters.”

 

Foy, Martin

         “Martin Foy” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax.

Library staff has been unable to verify Mr. Foy’s military service.

 

Glidden, Henry Hubbard

             According to a biographical entry in the 1917 Book of Chicagoans, Mr. Glidden was a member of Co. H,  73rd Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry and served from July 1862 to July 1865.

             The National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database provides the following information about the 73rdRegiment, Ind. Vol. Inf.  The regiment was organized at South Bend, Ind., and mustered in August 16, 1862.  It was attached to 20th Brigade, 6th Division, Army of the Ohio, September 1862. 20th Brigade, 6th Division, 2nd Corps, Army of the Ohio, to November 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Left Wing 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 21st Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to April 1863. Streight's Provisional Brigade. Dept. of the Cumberland, to May 1863.  The regiment was captured at Cedar Bluff, Alabama and held as prisoners of war until December 1863. Post and District of Nashville, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to January 1864. 1st Brigade, District of Nashville, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, January 1864. 1st Brigade, Rousseau's 3rd Division, 12th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to April 1864. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 20th Army Corps, Dept. of the Cumberland, to March 1865. District of Northern Alabama, Dept. of the Cumberland, to June 1865.

            The regiment was engaged in the battles of Perryville, Ky., October 8, 1862 and  Stone's River, December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863.  It took part in Streight's Raid to Rome, Ga., April 26-May 3, where it was captured.  The regiment was reorganized and rejoined the army at Nashville, Tenn., December 1863. Service during 1864 included guard duty along Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, and picketing Tennessee River from Draper's Ferry to Limestone Point.  The regiment saw action at Athens, Ala., October 1-2, 1864 and was involved in the defense of Decatur, Ala., October 26-29, 1864.  It was on duty at Stevenson, Ala., till January 1865, and at Huntsville, Ala., and along Mobile & Charleston Railroad till July 1865.   The regiment mustered out July 1, 1865.

            Mr. Glidden resided at 610 Waverly in Highland Park and was engaged in the insurance business with an office at 175 W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago.  He was born at Lithopolis, Ohio on July 2, 1844, the son of Timothy Holden and Mary (Tomlinson) Glidden .  He moved to Indiana with his family in 1857 and was employed in the mercantile business from 1866 to 1874.  Mr. Glidden married Effie F. Spencer on May 14, 1874 in Sangamon County, Illinois.  They had two children, Grace and Jay Spencer. Mr. Glidden was manager of the Chicago Underwriters’ Association from 1894 to 1906, and manager of the Chicago Board. of Underwriters since 1906.  He was a member of the Union League.  According to the 1931 Who’s Who in Chicago and Vicinity, Henry H. Glidden died on Dec. 27, 1929.

 

Goodridge, William Morton       

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             According to an article in the Memorial Day Number of the North Shore News-Letter (May 30, 1908), Mr. Goodridge served in the 45th Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteers.

The full text of that article provides the following details of his military service.

            “Among the thousands of young men who volunteered the day after Fort Sumpter (sic) was

fired on was our citizen whose portrait we give here.  His was the fifth name on the roll of about eighty men, who had a West Point graduate as Captain.      

             Before they were ready for the field, however, they were informed that the Government had men enough and this broke up the company.  Two or three weeks only passed before they were notified that they were needed.  A number of the men reorganized and Mr. Goodridge was elected second Lieutenant and the company was assigned to the sixteenth regiment Mass. Volunteers.  Their number at this time was only thirty men, and as thirty-two was the required number, they were again disbanded and Goodridge received an honorable discharge as 2nd Lieutenant.

            For a period of about a year he engaged in drilling a company of Home Guards, most of the members of which went into theservice as officers of various ranks.

            In 1862 he enlisted as private in Cadet Regiment of Boston 45th Reg’t Mass. Volunteers.  He was made sergeant of hisCompany and as such served for the term, being sent to Newbern N.C. under the command of Gen. John G. Foster.  

            Engaged in the battle of Kingston Dec. 14, 1862, he was wounded and from that day to this has carried a bullet in his body.

            Mr. Goodridge is a member of the Gen. John A. Logan Post No. 540 G.A.R. Dept. of Illinois, and has held various offices including that of Post Commander.  For several years he has been and still is officer of the Day in the Post at Evanston.

            Mr. Goodridge came to Highland Park February 1877 for a brief visit, and has made this City his home ever since, with the exception of a few years during which his home was rented.”

            According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, Mr. Goodridge served with Co., K, 45thRegiment, Massachusetts Militia Infantry.  The regiment was organized at Camp Meigs, Readville, between September 26-October 28, 1862.   It moved to Morehead City, N. C., on Steamer "Mississippi" November 5-14, 1862 and was attached to 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of North Carolina, to January, 1863; 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to May, 1863; and Lee's Brigade, Defences of Newberne, N. C., to June, 1863.

           The regiment was in camp on banks of the Trent near Newberne till December 12, 1862.  It participated in Foster's Expedition to Goldsboro December 12-20. It fought in the battle of Kinston on December 14,Whitehall on December 16 and Goldsboro December 17.  The regiment was on duty as post guard at Newberne January 26 to April 25, 1863, after which it moved to the mouth of the Trent, south side of the Neuse River, April 25.  It participated in an expedition toward Kinston, up the Atlantic & N. C. Railroad, April 27-May 1, 1863.  The regiment went into camp near Fort Spinola, mouth of Trent, till June 24. Regiment moved to Morehead City June 24 and embarked for Boston, Mass., arriving at Fortress Monroe June 26, and at Boston June 30. Mustered out July 8, 1863.

 

Hesler, George  

           “Geo. Hesler” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax. 

            In a 1929 interview Mr. Hesler stated, “In 1861 I went to New York, and thence via Panama to California....The Civil War was on.  I was enrolled in the army, but the government sent no California men to the front.” (Highland Park: The First Hundred Years. Highland Park, Ill., 1969?)

            Mr. Hesler’s obituary (Highland Park Press, December 22, 1932 – photo) states that he was one of Highland Park’s oldest citizens, and one of Lake County’s German pioneers.  He died at the home of a son, James Hesler, at 2380 South Green Bay Road. Mr. Hesler was born in Mehrendorf, Germany on June 1, 1839, and was more than 93 years old at the time of his death.  He was the son of John and Elizabeth Briesman Hesler.  His father was a forester in the service of the King of Bavaria.  The family immigrated to America in March 1848 aboard the ship Father Groner.  After arriving in Lake County, they purchased an acre of land on the east side of Green Bay Road just south of the present entrance to Ravinia Park.  In February 1861, Mr. Hesler started for California by way of New York to join his brother James who had gone to the west coast in 1852.  While in New York, Mr. Hesler heard Abraham Lincoln make a speech on Broadway. [Lincoln was in New York City on February 19 and 20, 1861. – ed.]  Mr. Hesler returned from California in 1864, arriving just in time to vote for Lincoln.  On November 29, 1864 he married Jane Tole.  They purchased land on Green Bay Road just north of the county line and engaged in farming.

 

James, William A.

            A History of Lake County Illinois (Roy S. Bates, 1912) by John J. Halsey states the Mr. James served with Rhode Island infantry and cavalry regiments during the Civil War.  Halsey’s History provides the following biographical details.

           “Col. William A. James was born in Providence, R.I., December 8, 1838.  He was educated in the common and high schools of Providence.  He enlisted May 27, 1861 in Co. A, 10th Rhode Island Infantry, and was mustered out September 1, 1861.  He re-enlisted October 1, 1862 as First Lieutenant in Co. C, 11th Rhode Island Infantry, and was mustered out July 13, 1863.  He re-entered the service as Captain of Co. L, 3rd Rhode Island Cavalry, January 7, 1864.  In April 1865, he was brevetted Colonel by President Lincoln.  He came to Chicago in 1865, and to Highland Park in 1871.  He was married in Springfield, Mass., March 31, 1869, to Miss Georgiana Case.  He was elected to the General Assembly from the 8th District in 1875, 1877 and 1879.  He was Speaker of the House for the 31st General Assembly.  He was elected Mayor of Highland Park in 1873, and died after a long career of usefulness.”

           The National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database states that Mr. James enlisted as an orderly in Co. A, 10th Rhode Island Infantry, and was mustered out as a First Sergeant.  Mr. James served with Companies E and C, 11th Rhode Island Infantry.  His rank in was First Lieutenant and rank out was Captain.  The regiment was organized at Providence and mustered in October 1, 1862.  It left Rhode Island for Washington, D. C., October 6 and was attached to Military District of Washington to December, 1862. District of Alexandria, Defences of Washington, and 22nd Army Corps, to April, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863.  It saw duty at East Capital Hill, Fort Ethan Allen and Miner's Hill, Defences of Washington, till January 14, 1863. Guard duty at Convalescent Camp till April 15. Moved to Norfolk, thence to Suffolk April 15-19.  The regiment participated in the seige of Suffolk from April 19 to May 4, 1863.   It participated in an expedition to destroy Norfolk & Petersburg Railroad and Seaboard & Roanoke Railroad May 16-27 and an expedition to Blackwater June 12-18.  The regiment moved to Norfolk June 19, thence to Yorktown, and to Williamsburg June 22. Duty at Williamsburg till June 30. Left Yorktown for home July 2. Mustered out July 13, 1863.

             According to the Portrait and Biographical Album of Lake County, Illinois (Chicago, 1891), Mr. James re-enlisted on January 7, 1864 as Captain of Co. L, 3rd Rhode Island Cavalry and was ordered to New Orleans.

             He was detached from the regiment and assigned to duty as Active Assistant Inspector General on the staff of Gen. E.R.S. Canby, commanding military division of West Mississippi from June 1864 to April 1865.  He took part in the Mobile campaign, the siege of Spanish Fort and Ft. Blakely and the capture of Mobile.  He was made Major and Lieutenant Colonel but resigned April 25, 1865, on account of physical disability contracted in the line of duty.  In April 1865, he was brevetted Colonel by President Lincoln for distinguished service in the Department of the Gulf.

             After the close of the War, the Colonel went to Chicago and engaged in the steam machinery business.  His business was destroyed by the great Chicago fire on October 9, 1871, but he resumed business shortly thereafter.  In 1871, Mr. James and his wife, Georgiana Case, took up residence in Highland Park where their son, Samuel Winthrop, was born on December 3rd of that year.

            Col. James was elected Mayor of Highland Park in 1873.  He was elected from the Eighth Senatorial District to the Illinois House of Representatives in 1875, was re-elected in 1877, and 1879 was elected Speaker of the House of the Thirty-First General Assembly.  In 1878 he was President of the Republican State Convention.

           He is a member of the U.S. Grant Post, No. 28, G.A.R., Department of Illinois, and is also a member of the Veteran Association of the Loyal Legion and the Royal Arcanum.

 

Kline, Stephen

           “Stephen Kline” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax. 

            The 1860 U.S. census for Lake County, Illinois lists Mr. Kline’s age as 19, and Prussia as his birthplace. At the time of the census, Mr. Kline was engaged in farming and was living with his parents, Jacob and Elizabeth and his brothers and sister: Peter (16), Jacob (13), John (9), Wendall (7), Mary (6), and Nicholas (2).

          According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database and the Database of Illinois Civil War Veterans, Mr. Kline served as a private with Co. D, 20th Regiment, Illinois Infantry.   The Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois: Containing Reports for the Years 1861-66 states that he was drafted and mustered in September 29, 1864.  He mustered out June 5, 1865.   During Mr. Kline’s service, the regiment acted as Provost Guard, 3rd Division, 17th Army Corps, from July 1864 to April 1865; and 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 17th Army Corps, to July 1865.  Mr. Kline joined the regiment in time to participate in General Sherman’s march to the sea through Georgia from November 15 through December 10, 1864 and engage in the battles for the Carolinas from January through April 1865.  The regiment was present at the surrender of Confederate General Johnston’s army.  It marched in the Grand Review in Washington, D.C. on May 24, 1865.

            The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database notes that he was drafted and mustered in on September 29, 1864 at Marengo, Illinois.  He mustered out on June 5, 1865 at Washington, DC.

 

Loesch, Frank

            “Frank Loesch” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax.

            Library staff has been unable to verify Mr. Loesch’s military service.

 Loesch, Henry

            Henry Loesch is listed as a Civil War veteran in the newspaper article, “Highland Men in the Civil War” (Highland Park News, August 26, 1943) by Mrs. Evva Truax.   The 1860 U.S. census for Lake County, Illinois says that Henry was 24 years old at the time of the census and was engaged in farming.  He and his brothers John and Peter were living with their 59-year-old mother, Catherine and a sister, Mary (17).  The census indicates that he and his siblings were born in Luxembourg.

Library staff has been unable to verify Mr. Loesch’s military service.

    

Loesch, John

            “John Loesch” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax. John was 16 years old at the time of the 1860 U.S. census. 

             According to Partridge’s History in Past and Present in Lake County and the Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, John Loesch served in Co K, 134th Regiment, Illinois Infantry.  His last name is spelled Lesche on the regimental roster.  Mr. Loesch enlisted on May 9, 1864.  The regiment was organized at Camp Fry, Chicago, Ill., and mustered in for 100 days May 31, 1864. It moved to Columbus, Ky., June 6-8 and was attached to District of Columbus, Ky. where it served on garrison duty at Columbus till October. Mustered out October 25, 1864.  For more information on one hundred-day men, see the entry for William Wallace Dike.

             The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database notes that John Lesche held the rank of private.  His residence was listed as Deerfield, Illinois.  He was 21 years old, 5’6” tall, had dark hair, gray eyes, and a light complexion.  He was unmarried.  His occupation was listed as carpenter.  He enlisted for a period of 100 days on May 9, 1864 in Chicago and mustered in on May 31, 1864 at Camp Fry, Illinois.  He mustered out on October 25, 1864 at Chicago.

 

Loesch, Peter

           “Peter Loesch” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax.  Peter was 22 years old at the time of the 1860 U.S. census. 

            According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, Peter Lesch (spelling varies), served in Co. H, 48th Regiment, Illinois Infantry.  The Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois: Containing Reports for the Years 1861-66 states that he was drafted on Nov. 17, 1864 and mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.  During the time of his service, the 48th Infantry was attached to the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Army Corps.

            The regiment participated in the siege of Savannah from December 10-21, 1864, the assault on and capture of Fort McAllister on December 13, 1864, and the campaign of the Carolinas from January to April 1865.  During that campaign the 48th took part in the following battles: Salkehatchie Swamp S. C., February 2-5, 1865; Dillingham's Cross Roads, or Duck Branch, February 3; South Edisto River, February 9; North Edisto River, February 11-12; Columbia, February 15-17; Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 20-21; and Bennett's House, April 26.   The 48th was present at the surrender of Johnston and his army, marched to Washington, D. C. via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19, and marched in the Grand Review May 24, 1865.

            The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database lists Pvt. Peter Lesch as 25 years old, 5’9” tall, brown hair, blue eyes, with a light complexion.  His occupation was listed as farmer and birthplace, Germany.  He mustered in for a one year period on November 17, 1864 at Marengo, Illinois and mustered out on August 15, 1865 at Little Rock, Arkansas.

            Mr. Loesch’s obituary (North Shore News-Letter, Dec. 30, 1905) says that he was born in 1836 and came to America when he was nine years old.  In 1853 he came to Highland Park and from that time until 10 years ago was a citizen of this city.  His funeral was held on from his daughter’s residence, 614 Sheffield avenue, Chicago, and the interment was in St. Boniface cemetery, Ravenswood.  Mr. Loesch was survived by six children, Peter and Joseph of Highland Park, Frank and Michael of Chicago, Mrs. George Detrick of Glencoe, and Mrs. John Meyer of Chicago.

 

McCraren, Thomas  

            “Thomas McCraren” is listed as a Civil War veteran in the newspaper article, “Highland Men in the Civil War” (Highland Park News, August 26, 1943) by Mrs. Evva Truax. 

             Mr. McCraren served in Co. C, 42nd Regiment, Illinois Infantry.  “The Lake County War History and Record” by Charles A Partridge in The Past and Present in Lake County, Illinois. (Chicago: Wm Le Baron & Co., 1877) states that he enlisted on Nov. 15, 1864, and was mustered out on Nov. 15, 1865.  His name in that source is spelled McKeran. 

            The 42nd was attached to the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps to June, 1865; 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, to August, 1865; and Dept. of Texas, to December, 1865.

            The 42nd was dispatched to pursue Confederate General Hood through Tennessee, where it saw action at the decisive battles of Franklin on November 30 and Nashville, December 15-16, 1864.  The 42nd took heavy casualties at the battles of Spring Hill (Nov. 29) and Franklin, losing 24 killed, 95 wounded and 30 prisoners.  Following the war, the regiment saw duty in New Orleans and Texas before being discharged at Springfield, Ill., January 10, 1866.

            The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database listed his rank as private.  His residence was Deerfield.  He was 41 years old, 5’7” tall, had sandy hair and complexion, and gray eyes.  His occupation was listed as farmer and birthplace, Ireland.  He mustered in for a one year period on November 15, 1864 at Marengo, Illinois.  He mustered out on November 15, 1865 at Victoria, Texas.

            Mr. McCraren’s obituary (North Shore News-Letter, August 21,1905) states,  “On Saturday last Highland Park lost one of its first and oldest settlers – Thomas McCraren, who died at his home on Deerfield road, August 5.  Mr. McCraren was born in Ireland, eighty-three years ago, and came to America when a boy.  He has lived in and about Highland Park for sixty-five years and has seen the town grow from infancy, and indeed took an active part in its making.  He sawed the logs for the first church established in this portion of Illinois, and helped to build it, and he was one of the pioneers who felled the trees which gave place to the wood which is now Central avenue.  Mr. McCraren was a member of the G.A.R., having served his country for four years during the Civil War.”

 

Mahan, John

           “John Mahan” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax.  He appears on the 1870 U.S. census for Lake County, Illinois with his parents, James and Fanny.  He was 28 years old at the time and his occupation is listed as “soldier.”

           The Database of Illinois Civil War Veterans states that John Mahan served in Co. K, 72nd Regiment, Illinois Infantry (the First Chicago Board of Trade Regiment), The Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois: Containing Reports for the Years 1861-66 indicates that Mr. Mahan was recruited on January 16, 1864 and mustered in on January 31, 1864.  During his service, Mr. Mahan was transferred to Co. K, 33rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry.  He was mustered out on November 24, 1865.

         The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database notes that Pvt. Mahan was 18 years old when he enlisted for a three year term on January 16, 1864 in Chicago.  He was 5’7” tall, had dark hair, gray eyes, and a florid complexion.  His occupation was listed as cattle drover and his birthplace, Bath, Maine.  He mustered in on January 31, 1864 in Chicago.  Remarks in his service record provide the following information:  TRANS TO 33 ILL INF PER SO 113 HQ 16 AC JUL 17, 1865.

        The 72nd was attached to the1st Brigade, 1st Division, 17th Army Corps, to November, 1864; Unassigned, 23rd Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, to December, 1864; 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Detachment Army Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to February, 1865; and 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 16th Army Corps (New), Military Division West Mississippi, to August, 1865.

        The 72nd was on provost guard duty in Vicksburg, Miss. from October 1863 until October 30,1864.  The regiment was engaged in the battles of Franklin, November 30 and Nashville, December 15-16, 1864.  In his book Illinois in the Civil War, Victor Hicken provides the following details of the battle of Franklin.  The battle occurred on a “bright, invigorating Indian summer day” according to Captain James Sexton of the 72nd.  It was after three o’clock in the afternoon before Confederate General Hood mounted his attack.  The Confederates were able to turn the Union flank, throwing the Federals into confusion.  Only the 72nd Illinois, recently arrived from the Army of the Tennessee could be seen maintaining their position, their black hats bobbing up and down as they loaded and reloaded their rifles.  About to be overwhelmed by the triumphant Confederates, reserve regiments came forward to prevent a complete route of the Union troops. Captain Sexton went on to describe the battle as a “private soldier’s battle, the sum of its strategy being to hold and occupy a few square feet upon which the soldiers stood to the last.”  Another Illinois soldier added: “There was no side-stepping or fiddling, it was simply a free fight, on an open field.”  Engaged in hand-to-hand conflict, the battle reached a savage level.  The 72nd continued fighting in the position it had held at the beginning of the conflict...and paid a price for its constancy.  The 72nd suffered more casualties at the battle of Franklin than any other Illinois regiment, losing 9 of its officers and 152 of its 325 men.

         During the closing months of the war, the 72nd was stationed in Mississippi, New Orleans, and Alabama.  It mustered out August 7, 1865.

         The 33rd was one of the more unusual regiments from Illinois.  It was originally raised on the campus of the Illinois State Normal School near Bloomington and was formed principally of college students.   It was known as the “Teacher’s Regiment.”  The 33rd infantry was attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 16th Army Corps, Military Division West Mississippi, to June 1865; and Dept. of Mississippi, to November 1865.

          The 33rd was on duty at Meridian and Vicksburg, Miss. from May 17 until November 1865. Mustered out November 24 and discharged at Chicago, Ill., December 6, 1865.

 

Mooney, James

            According to the Database of Illinois Civil War Veterans, James Mooney served as a private in Co. E, 113th Regiment, Illinois Infantry.  His residence was listed as Highland Park, Illinois.  He was 18 years old, 5’6 ½” tall, had sandy hair, blue eyes, and a light complexion.  He was unmarried.  His occupation was listed a farmer and his birthplace, Chicago.  He enlisted for a three year period on August 11, 1862 at Palatine and was mustered in on October 1, 1862.  He mustered out on June 20, 1865 at Memphis, Tennessee.

 

Mooney, John  

          “John Mooney” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinios (1920) and in “Highland Men in the Civil War” (Highland Park News, August 26, 1943), both by Evva Egan Truax.  The newspaper article states that Mr. Mooney’s “mother went south to nurse at the time of the Civil War largely because she had a son, who went to the front, but she vanished somewhere, and never returned, though Mr. Mooney met trains for years, hoping against hope.”

            At the time of the 1860 U.S. census, 21-year-old John was living in a household headed by his brother Thomas.  Living with them was their 45-year-old mother, Maria and brothers and sisters: James (16), Ellen (12), Sylvester (10), and Elizabeth (8).  All were listed as born in Ireland except the youngest three children.

            Mr. Mooney served in Co. D, 20th Regiment, Illinois Infantry.  “The Lake County War History and Record” by Charles A Partridge in The Past and Present in Lake County, Illinois. (Chicago: Wm Le Baron & Co., 1877) indicates that Mr. Mooney was drafted on Sept. 30, 1864 and mustered out on June 5, 1865.

            During Mr. Mooney’s service, the 20th was attached to Provost Guard, 3rd Division, 17th Army Corps, to April 1865; and 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 17th Army Corps, to July 1865.

            The regiment was engaged in operations in North Georgia and North Alabama against Hood September 28-November 3, 1864.   It joined Sherman’s march to the sea November 15-December 10 and participated in the siege of Savannah December 10-21, 1864.  The 20thjoined the campaign of the Carolinas January to April 1865, which included the battles of Salkehatchie Swamp, S. C., February 1-5. Barker's Mills, Whippy Swamp, February 2. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Columbia February 15-17. Fayetteville, N. C., March 13. Battle of Bentonville March 20-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26.   The regiment witnessed the surrender of Johnston and his army.  It marched to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19, and participated in the Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June 7-12. Mustered out July 16 and discharged at Chicago, Ill., July 24, 1865.

            According to the Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database, John Mooney was 26 years old, 5’6 ½” tall, had sandy hair, blue eyes, and a florid complexion.  His occupation was listed as laborer and his birthplace, Ireland.  He was drafted and mustered in for a one year term of service on September 30, 1864 at Marengo, Illinois.  He mustered out on June 5, 1865 at Washington, DC.

           Mr. Mooney’s obituary (Highland Park Press, April 6, 1922) provides some details of his Civil War military service.  “John Mooney, pioneer settler of Deerfield township died at 5 o’clock this morning.  Mr. Mooney was born in Ireland in 1838, emigrating to American and settling in the township in 1844.  Mr. Mooney was engaged in agricultural pursuits during the early years of his life, and in 1886 became interested in the manufacture of bricks, which together with farming formed his life’s work.  He was a veteran of the Civil War, having fought in the battle of Nashville, and that of Kingston under General Thomas and later under Gen. Sherman.  In 1865, Mr. Mooney wedded Miss Theresa McAdams, who died in 1882.  He was married to Miss Margaret Peters in 1884, who died very suddenly a few weeks ago.  Mr. Mooney leaves to survive him two daughters, Mary Mooney and Mrs. J.D. Garrity; three sons, Alexander, Joseph and Thomas, all of Highland Park; two sisters Miss Ann Mooney and Mrs. Joseph Phillips of Chicago.  Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 10:00 o’clock at St. James church, Highwood.  Interment will be at St. Mary’s cemetery, west of Highland Park.”

 

Mooney, Thomas 

            “Thos. Mooney” is listed as a Civil War veteran in the newspaper article, “Highland Men in the Civil War” (Highland Park News, August 26, 1943) by Mrs. Evva Truax.  Thomas Mooney was 23 years old at the time of the 1860 U.S. census. 

             According to the biographical entry for his brother, John in Portrait and Biographical Album of Lake County (1891), Thomas Mooney, the eldest son of the family “was an engineer on a steamer in Southern waters at the time of the breaking out of the Rebellion. He was forced into the Confederate army from which he made his escape after a service of two years and enlisted in the Union army.  He died of cholera in Galveston, Tex., while on his way to get the body of his mother.”  The same biographical entry states that his mother had died in New Orleans in the spring of 1864, where she had gone to care for her son, an invalid soldier.

            Library staff has been unable to verify Thomas Mooney’s military service.

 

Morgan, Otho H.

Morgan 5-30-08.jpg

           The National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database lists Otho H. Morgan in the 7th Battery, Indiana Light Artillery.  He mustered in as a 2nd lieutenant in 1861 and mustered out after a three-year enlistment as a captain.  The battery was organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in December 2, 1861.   It was attached to Artillery, 4th Division, Army of the Ohio, to June, 1862. Artillery, 1st Division, Army of the Ohio, to September, 1862. Artillery, 5th Division, 2nd Corps, Army of the Ohio, to November, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, Left Wing 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. Artillery, 3rd Division, 21st Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1863. Artillery, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, to July, 1864, and Artillery Brigade, 14th Army Corps, to October, 1864.

            During his years of service, the battery took part in many of the major battles in the west, including the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Perryville, Stone’s River, Chickamauga, and the Atlanta campaign.  In a letter to his father, Captain Morgan describes the battle of Lookout Mountain and the assault on Missionary Ridge that took place in November 1863.

            An article in the Memorial Day Number of the North Shore News-Letter (May 30, 1908) provides the following details of Captain Morgan’s military service.

           “Among the men of the North Shore who distinguished themselves in the conflict of the early ‘60s is Captain O.H. Morgan, whose portrait we are privileged to present.

            Mr. Morgan entered the service in Dec. 1861, as Second Lieutenant of the Seventh Indiana Light Battery, and in 1863 [Portrait and Biographical Album of Lake County, Illinois (Chicago, 1891) gives this date as March 1864. – ed.] he was promoted to the office of Captain.  He gave three years of active service, during which time his battery constituted a part of the army of the Cumberland, participating in the march from Louisville, through Kentucky and Tennessee to northern Mississippi.  Marching back over much the same territory they were in pursuit of Bragg’s army to Louisville.  Thence south again through Tennessee and Georgia where, after the capture of Atlanta, the battery was ordered to Indianapolis for muster out in December 1864.

            This made three years of active service for Mr. Morgan.  He was engaged with his battery in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Lookout Mountain and the memorable Atlanta campaign, culminating in the battle of Jonesboro and the fall of Atlanta.”

            Captain Morgan’s obituary (Highland Park Press, October 18, 1923) gives the following life history.

            Captain Otho H. Morgan was born on August 11, 1838, at Lawrenceberg, Indiana.  He served three years in the Civil War, entering the army as a second lieutenant in1861, and later becoming a captain in the Seventh Indiana Battery which he recruited at Terre Haute.  He was at Chickamauga, Shiloh, and on the march to Atlanta.  The Civil War experience left a deep impression upon his life and those who were privileged to know him in later years realized that he reflected the very best traditions of that great struggle.  He was a faithful member of the Loyal Legion.

            In 1864 Captain Morgan was married to Julia Potwin, of Terre Haute.  In 1866 Captain Morgan, in partnership with his father-in-law, Anson C. Potwin, founded the Chicago Varnish Company.  Subsequently he became its president and remained in that position for over thirty-five years.  He retired from active work in business in 1920.

            In 1873 Captain Morgan became a resident of Highland Park.  He was mayor in 1879-1880, and alderman in 1877 and again from 1883 to 1886.

            Captain Morgan died on October 16, 1923 of pneumonia.  His wife had died in February 1923.  He was survived by his two sons, Anson C. and Elisha, his three daughters, Mrs. Robert C. Day, Mrs. Tom W. Bellhouse, and Mrs. Frank S. North, and grandchildren.

            The Portrait and Biographical Album of Lake County, Illinois provides the following details.  On his return from the war, Mr. Morgan engaged in the varnish business in Chicago with Mr. A.C. Potwin.  The business was incorporated in 1885 as the Chicago Varnish Company.  Mr. Morgan was made Vice-President of the company on its organization, and in 1889 succeeded to the position of President.  In the great fire of Chicago on the 9th and 10th of October 1871, he lost his business plant and stock and his residence.  In the spring of 1872 he erected a fine residence in Highland Park on Port Clinton Ave. [later known as Sheridan Road – ed.].  It was destroyed by fire, and Mr. Morgan built a new home on the same site in 1891.

            On the 19th of January 1864, Capt. Morgan was united in marriage in Terre Haute, Ind., with Miss Julia, daughter of Anson C. and Helen (Van Deren) Potwin. They had six children; William P., Anson C., Elisha, Catherine Coit, Helen Van Deren, and Julia.

            Capt. Morgan holds membership with John A. Logan Post, G.A.R., of Evanston, and of the Illinois Commandery, Military order Loyal Legion.

            See an 1864 photograph of Otho Morgan at the time he was promoted to Captain.

            Read the History of the 7th Independent Battery, Indiana Light Artillery by O.H. Morgan and E.R. Murphy.

         

Moroney, Thomas

           “Thom. Maroney, Enlisted May 1862, ILL. 89th Volunteers” is listed in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax. 

            At the time of the 1860 U.S. census for Lake County, Illinois, the 22-year-old Thomas was occupied as a railroad laborer and living with his parents William and Mary.  The census lists his birthplace as Ireland.

            The National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database indicates that Thomas Marony [Moroney] served in Co. C, 89th Regiment, Illinois Infantry.   He enlisted on August 9, 1862 and was mustered in on Aug. 27, 1862.  

            The 89th regiment was organized at Chicago, Ill. and mustered in on August 27, 1862. It was known as the “Railroad Regiment” because most of its men had been employed by the railroad prior to their enlistment.  The 89th moved to Louisville, Ky. on September 4, 1862 and was attached as follows: to Army of Kentucky to September, 1862; 6th Brigade, 2nd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, to November, 1862; 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Right Wing, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863; 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1863; and 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 4th Army Corps, to June, 1865.

           The 89th saw some of the toughest fighting in the West.  It was involved in the pursuit of Confederate General Bragg into Kentucky October 1-15, 1862, which led to the battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8, 1862.  Perryville was a quick and brutal initiation to war for many Illinois regiments.  It rivaled Shiloh in savagery.  The 89th played a decisive role in the battle of Stone's River on December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863.   This battle had one of the highest casualty rates of any during the Civil War.  The losses on both sides were tremendous.  The Confederates suffered an estimated 11,700 casualties out of the 38,000 troops engaged.  The Union losses were 13,249 out of the 45,000 men involved.  One authority, in calculating the casualties for each 1,000 Union troops engaged, places the number for the battle of Stone’s River at 223.  With Gettysburg showing a comparable figure of 212, Shiloh rating at 162, and Antietam at 155.  The 89th lost 142 men killed, wounded or prisoners at Stone’s River.  The regiment was one of three from Illinois that led the attack at Liberty Gap, Tenn., June 22-27, 1863.  It participated in the Chickamauga campaign from August 16-September 22, 1863 and the battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-20.  The regiment fought under Maj. General George H. Thomas who was “Pap” to his soldiers and became known as the “Rock of Chickamauga” when regiments under his command held the line against the determined assault of Confederate forces while Generals Rosecrans, Crittenden, and McCook, along with assorted division commanders and their troops fled in confusion.  The 89th was positioned at one end of the Union line during the battle.  The changing direction of the rolling musketry indicated to them that the Federal right had been turned and they would soon be “next in line.”  Thomas realized that it was impossible for his troops to retreat, so he gathered the remaining regiments and took a position to face the Confederate onslaught.  There was little in the way of military organization among the elements gathered by Thomas.  It was a patchwork line, and Confederate General Longstreet was poised to take advantage of it.  During the terrible fighting that followed, the shortage of ammunition forced the Federal soldiers to rob the dead of their cartridges.  Fighting without relief against assaults, it appeared that surrender was imminent.   At the last possible moment two brigades of Union troops marching at the double quick came to the aid of Thomas’s exhausted men and drove back the Confederates in desperate fighting. 

              Following the siege of Chattanooga from September 24-November 23, 1863, the 89th was engaged in the Chattanooga-Ringgold campaign, November 23-27 and the battle of Mission Ridge, November 25, 1863.  At Mission Ridge, the 89th took part in one of the most legendary assaults of the war. Exasperated and frustrated because they had been held in reserve all day (a stinging insult to these hardened veterans) as the battle waged and other units were selected by Grant for the main assaults, General Thomas’s troops in the Army of the Cumberland (including the 89st) struck with a vengeful fury when at last ordered to attack.  It was sometime between three and four o’clock in the afternoon when the six cannon shots signifying the beginning of Thomas’ assault were fired.  At the first loud boom, the men of the Army of the Cumberland, according to one Illinois officer, began to fall in and dress without command.  By the time the fifth report was heard, the men were moving forward without command.  When the sound of the sixth shot echoed along the ridge, the bands began to play and the colors of each regiment were unfurled.  Ordered by Grant to move forward and take the enemy trenches at the foot of the ridge, Thomas’s army did not stop.  In the face of a hail of bullets and artillery shells raining down the slope, the soldiers broke into a run.  What followed was a rapid foot race over fallen logs and through high brush up the slope of the ridge as regiments vied to reach the crest.  Wild with excitement, the whole Federal line of battle (25,000 men) in a mile-wide formation advanced so rapidly that the exhausted soldiers fell to the ground at the top of the ridge, too tired to pursuit the fleeing enemy. 

            The 89th was involved in the Atlanta Campaign from May to September 1864, including the battle of Resaca May 14-15 and around Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills, May 25-June 5. It was engaged in operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2, including the assault on Kenesaw June 27. 

            According to the Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database, Thomas Marony served as a private.  He was 22 years old, 5’6 ½” tall, had brown hair, blue eyes, and a dark complexion.  He was unmarried.  His occupation was listed as laborer and his birthplace, Ireland.  He enlisted for a three year period on August 9, 1862 and mustered in on August 27, 1862 at Chicago.  He died July 30, 1864 at Chattanooga, Tennessee of wounds received at Kenesaw Mountain.

 

Mott, John Grenville

          According to his obituary (Highland Park Press, February 19, 1920), Mr. Mott served in the Union Army.  The Book of Chicagoans(1917) states that Mr. Mott served for four months in the Union Army in West Virginia during 1862.

            Library staff has been unable to find additional details of Mr. Mott’s Civil War service.

 

Mowers, Martin

          “Martin Mowers” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax.  The 1870 U.S. census for Lake County, Illinois lists Martin Mowers, aged 30, living with his parents Peter and Caroline, and two sisters, Mary A. (29) and Caroline (28).

            The National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database lists Martin A. Mowers in McLain’s Independent Battery, Colorado Light Artillery.  He was mustered in as a private and mustered out as Quartermaster Sergeant.  The Roll of Honor: Record of Burial Places of Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Army Nurses of All Wars of the United States Buried in the State of Illinois(Springfield, Ill., 1929) states that Mr. Mowers was a member of the 3rd Col. Battery and is buried at Half Day Cemetery.

           McLain’s battery was organized at Denver, Colorado on December 15, 1862.  It was attached to District of Colorado to July 1864; District of Upper Arkansas to December 1864; and District of South Kansas to April 1865. 
            It was on duty at Fort Lyon, Colo., operating against Indians from December 1862, to July 1863 and then stationed at Camp Weld till December 1863.  It served scout duty from Port Garland, Colo., October 12-16, 1863 and was stationed at Denver December 1863, to June 1864.   It conducted an expedition from Denver to Republican River, Kansas, April 8-23, 1864 and saw action at Big Bushes, Smoky Hill, Kansas, April 16.  The battery was ordered to District of Kansas June 1864 and later to Fort Larned, District of South Kansas, till August 1864. (A Detachment at Lawrence, Kansas.) It was ordered to Lawrence August 9, and duty in District of Upper Arkansas, and was stationed at Paola till October 1864.  The battery was engaged in operations against Price's Invasion October-November.   It saw action at Little Blue River October 21, Big Blue October 22, the decisive battle at Westport October 23, Mine Creek, Marias des Cygnes, Charlot, October 25, Newtonia October 28, and Cane Hill, November 6.   The battery was stationed at Paola, Kansas, till May 1865.   It was ordered to Fort Scott and Fort Gibson, and duty in District of North Kansas till August. Mustered out August 31, 1865.

 

O’Brien, David 

            “David O’Brien, Enlisted May 1862, Ill, 89th Volunteers” is listed in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax.

The Index to the 1862 Military Census of Lake County, Illinois states that he was 44 years old, born in Ireland, and was serving with the 89th Illinois Infantry at the time of the census. 

            According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, Mr. O’Brien served with Co. C, 89thIllinois Infantry.  He was mustered in on August 27, 1862 when the unit was organized in Chicago.  He died at Andersonville prison on October 13, 1864.  Library staff has been unable to determine when Mr. O’Brien became a prisoner.  Please refer to the entry for Thomas Moroney for a history of the 89th Infantry.

            The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database notes that David O’Brien was 39 years old 5’4” tall, had black hair, black eyes, and a dark complexion.  He was married, occupied as a laborer, and was born in Ireland.  His enlisted for a three year term on August 14, 1862 and was mustered in on August 27, 1862 at Chicago.  He died of disease on June 25, 1864 at Andersonville prison in Georgia and was buried in grave number 10,851 there. 

 

Paine, Milo

            “Served until the end; Milo Paine” is listed in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois by Evva Egan Truax.

             Library staff is unable to verify Mr. Paine’s military service.  However there was a Milo C. Payne who served in the 101st Ohio Infantry, Company E and a Milo Payne who served in the 10th Indiana Infantry, Company E.

 

Richards, Frederick C.

         “Geo. Richards” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History Highland Park Illinios (1920) by Evva Egan Truax.  Library staff has determined that this was Frederick Richards who enlisted under the name Frederick Strobar.

           According to the Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database, Mr. Richards served in Co. I, 17th Illinois Cavalry. Please refer to the entry for Edward P. Bartlett for a history of the 17th Cavalry.  Mr. Richards was 18 years old, 5’4” tall, had dark hair and complexion, and hazel eyes.  His occupation was listed as mechanic and his birthplace, Ohio.  He enlisted for a three year term of service at Waukegan on December 30, 1863 and was mustered in on the same day from St. Charles.  He mustered out on November 23, 1865 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

            Mr. Richards’s obituary (Highland Park Press, December 6, 1928) gives the following life history.  “Mr. Frederick C. Richards, one of the pioneer residents of Highland Park and Lake county, passed away Monday evening at the Highland Park hospital.  About a week ago he had been removed to the hospital because of an infected foot.  Later it was found that amputation was necessary.  The operation was very successful and it was thought that he was getting along nicely, until Monday when a change took place and he died suddenly at six-thirty in the afternoon.  Mr. Richards was born in Waukegan on February 24, 1846.  At the age of 18 he enlisted in the Army and served during the closing days of the civil war with Company “I”, 17th Illinois Cavalry.  He was raised in Waukegan by a well-known old family by the name of Strohbahr and when he enlisted in the army he use this name but later changed back to the correct name of Richards upon receiving his Honorable Discharge in 1866.  He was married on Dec. 8, 1865 to Mary Tredeau and moved to Highland Park about 56 years ago.  He is well know as one of the longest serving employees of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway, having been with that one company for over 37 years, finally being pensioned on account of age rather than disability to work.  Mr. Richards was a rugged man, never knowing a sick day in his entire life until a few weeks ago.  His friends admired him for his honesty and responsibility.  He was always dependable and faithful to his family and friends.  He was a member of the Catholic church all his life and due to his own wishes he was buried from St. Joseph’s church, Waukegan, which church he was a member of during his boyhood.  Mr. Richards was a member of the Immaculate Conception church of this city.  The American Legion rendered honors due an old veteran.  Funeral services were held this morning (Thursday) at 9:30 a.m.  Burial was in Waukegan cemetery.  He is survived by his widow, Mary Richards, who is confined to a sick bed at the present time due to very poor health and by five children as follows: Mrs. L.H.W. Speidel and Charles A. Richards of Lake Forest, Mrs. Charles E. Geary, Fred N. Richards and Peter Richards of Highland Park.”

 

Root, Andrew Preston

          According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, an Andrew B. Root served in the 27thRegiment, Wisconsin Infantry.  Library staff believes this is Andrew Preston Root.

            The Roster of Wisconsin Volunteers, War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865, lists Andrew Root’s residence as Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin at the time he joined the regiment on August 15, 1862.  He was promoted to corporal, then sergeant.  He mustered out on August 29, 1865.

            The regiment was organized at Milwaukee, Wis., and mustered in March 7, 1863. It was attached to District of Columbus, Ky., 6th Division, 16th Army Corps, Dept. of the Tennessee, to May, 1863; 3rd Brigade, Kimball's Provisional Division, 16th Army Corps, to July, 1863; 3rd Brigade, Kimball's Division, District of Eastern Arkansas, to August, 1863; 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Arkansas Expedition, to January, 1864; 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Arkansas, to April, 1864; 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, to May, 1864; 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, to February, 1865; 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, Reserve Corps, Military Division West Mississippi, February, 1865; and 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 13th Army Corps, Military Division West Mississippi, to August, 1865.    

           The 27th participated in the siege of Vicksburg , Miss., June 4-July 4, 1863.  It was ordered to Helena, Ark., July 25, and was on duty there till August when it participated in Steele's Expedition against Little Rock, Ark., August 10-September 10, 1863.   After duty at Little Rock till March 23, 1864, it joined Steele's Expedition to Camden, March 23-May 3, 1864 and was engaged in a number of battles for the remainder of 1864.   The 27th was ordered to New Orleans, La., February 7, 1865, and thence to Navy Cave, Mobile Bay where it participated in the campaign against Mobile and its defenses, March 17-April 12, 1865.   The regiment was stationed in Alabama and Texas until it mustered out August 5, 1865.

            Mr. Root’s obituary (Highland Park Press, July 30, 1925) states that he was born in Hebron, Illinois, April 13, 1849.  When he was a young man at Hebron he enlisted in the regular army, serving for five years.  After his return home from the army he married Marcey Gookin.  They lived in Highland Park for twenty-five years.  Following his wife’s death, Mr. Root visited his sister in Albion, Nebraska and while there married Mrs. Anna Peterson and engaged in farming for the remainder of his life.  In addition to his wife, Mr. Root was survived by three children from his first marriage, Sara E., Harold A. and Guy P., and two step-children, Charles Arnold and Herbert A.

 

Sasch, Nicholas 

           A “Mr. Sasch” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax.

           According to The Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois: Containing Reports for the Years 1861-66 (where his name is listed as Nicholas Serp), Mr. Sasch served in Co. H, 32nd Regiment, Illinois Infantry.  He was mustered in as a private on September 30, 1864 and mustered out as a private on June 2, 1865.  Pension records list the date of discharge as June 3, 1865.  During his time of service, the 32nd was attached to the 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps to November 1864, 3rd Brigade, 4th Division, 17thArmy Corps to April 1865 and the 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps to July 1865.  The regiment participated in General Sherman’s march to the sea through Georgia, November 15-December 10 and fought in the campaign of the Carolinas, January to April 1865. The regiment’s final battle of the war was the battle of Bennett's House April 26, 1865 where it witnessed the surrender of Johnston and his army.  The regiment marched to Washington, D.C. via Richmond, Virginia from April 29 to May 19 and participated in the Grand Review on May 24, 1865.

            Mr. Sasch’s name appears under various spellings in military records, most commonly as Sesh or Sash.  According to the Company Muster Roll, Mr. Sasch was temporarily attached to the Co. I, 132nd Regiment, New York Infantry for January and February 1865. At that time, the regiment was attached to the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, District of Beaufort, N.C., Department of North Carolina.  The Company Muster Roll of May and June 1865 indicates that Mr. Sasch was drafted and mustered in on September 30, 1864 at Marengo, Illinois for one year.  On July 29, 1890, Mr. Sasch applied for an invalid pension.  He died on November 18, 1890.

 

Thursk, Robert 

           “Mr. Robert Thursk” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax. 

             According to the1860 U.S. census for Lake County, Illinois, Robert Thirsk was 19 years old, born in England, and occupied on his father’s farm.  At the time of the census he was living with his father, Thomas, mother, Mary Anne, and the following brothers and sisters: Emma (21), Ida (13), Furman (11), Maria (8), and John W. (4).  Except for John, all were born in England.

             According to the Database of Illinois Civil War Veterans, Mr. Thirsk served in Co. E, 113th Regiment, Illinois Infantry.  TheReport of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois: Containing Reports for the Years 1861-66 states that Robert Thusk enlisted on August 11, 1862, was mustered in on October 1, 1862, and was discharged on April 5, 1863.

             The regiment was organized at Camp Hancock, near Chicago, Ill., and mustered in October 1, 1862.  During Mr. Thursk’s service, it was attached to 1st Brigade, District of Memphis, Tenn., Right Wing 13th Army Corps (Old), Department of the Tennessee, November, 1862; 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Memphis, 13th Army Corps, to December, 1862; 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Sherman's Yazoo Expedition to January, 1863; and 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to August, 1863. 

             The regiment participated in Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. "Tallahatchie March," November 26-December 12, 1862. Sherman's Yazoo Expedition December 20, 1862-January 2, 1863.   It saw action in the battle of Chickasaw Bayou, December 26-28, 1862 and at Chickasaw Bluff on December 29.   It took part in the assault and capture of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, January 10-11, 1863 where the regiment incurred heavy losses.   The 113th moved to Young's Point, La., January 17-22, and was on duty there till March.  It joined the expedition to Rolling Fork, Miss., via Muddy, Steele's and Black Bayous and Deer Creek March 14-27, 1863.

            The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database notes that Robert Thursk was 21 years old, 5’7” tall, had brown hair, gray eyes, and a light complexion.  He was unmarried.  His occupation was listed as farmer and his birthplace, England.  He enlisted for a three year term of service on August 11, 1862 at Palatine, Illinois and mustered in on October 1, 1862 at Chicago.  He was discharged on April 5, 1863 at Youngs Point, Louisiana.

 

Timberlake, Milton J.

            According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, Mr. Timberlake served in Co. C, 45thRegiment, Ohio Infantry.

            The 45th was organized at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, August 19, 1862. It was ordered to Covington, Ky., and participated in the defense of Cincinnati, Ohio, against threatened attack by Confederate General Kirby Smith.   The regiment was attached to 3rd Division, Army of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, September and October, 1862; 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of Kentucky, to January, 1863; District of Central Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to June, 1863; 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. of the Ohio, to July, 1863; 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to August, 1863; 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to October, 1863; 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to December, 1863; 3rd Brigade, 1st Division Cavalry Corps, Dept. of the Ohio, to April, 1864; 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 23rd Army Corps, to June, 1864; 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 23rd Army Corps, June, 1864; 2nd Brigade, and 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1865.

           The regiment was engaged in operations in Central Kentucky against Confederate Col. Cluke's forces February 18-March 5, 1863. The 45th was converted to a mounted infantry unit at Danville and Brigaded with 7th Ohio and 10th Kentucky Cavalry.  It was involved in operations against Confederate Lieut. Col. Pegram, March 22-April 1 and in operations in Southeastern Kentucky, April 26-May 12 and Monticello May 1. Skirmishes about Monticello April 28-May 2.  The 45th took part in Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee, August 16-October 17, 1863 and in a number of small battles and skirmishes during the remainder of 1863.   The regiment was dismounted on April 6, 1864.  It took part in the Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September, 1864 including the battles of Resaca May 14-15, DallasNew Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5, operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountains, June 10-July 2 and the assault on Kenesaw June 27.   The 45th took part in the siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25, and was engaged in operations against Confederate General Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama, September 29-November 3, 1864.   It took part in the Nashville and the battles of Franklin, November 30 and Nashville December 15-16. It mustered out June 12, 1865.

            Mr. Timberlake’s obituary (Highland Park Press, February 5, 1931) says, “Mr. Milton J. Timberlake, of Highland Park, nearing the age of eighty-nine years, passed away peacefully early Monday morning at the home of his daughter Mrs. Arthur B. Haven.  He served three years in the Civil War, then entered the grain business.  He married Sarah Martin of Lafayette, Indiana, with whom he lived happily to celebrate his fiftieth anniversary.  He is survived by his daughter, and a son Mr. George Timberlake of Centralia.”

 

Troxel, Thomas G.

          Mr. Troxel served in Co. E, 25th Regiment, Iowa Infantry.  The regiment was organized at Mount Pleasant and mustered in Sept. 27, 1862.  It was attached to District of Eastern Arkansas, Dept. Missouri, to December, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, District of Eastern Arkansas, Dept. Tennessee, December, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 11th Division, Right Wing 13th Army Corps, Dept. Tennessee, December, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Sherman's Yazoo Expedition, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 15th Army Corps, Army Tennessee, to December, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 15th Corps, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 15th Corps, to September, 1864, and 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 15th Corps, to June, 1865.  Mr. Troxel mustered out as a 1st Sergeant.

            During Mr. Troxel’s service, the regiment was engaged in the following battles and campaigns: Sherman’s Yazoo expedition December 22, 1862 to January 2, 1863, including the battle of Chickasaw Bayou, Dec. 26-28, 1862; participated in the siege of Vicksburg, May 18- July 4, 1863; the battles of Chattanooga, Mission Ridge, Ringgold Gap, Nov. 23-27, 1863; performed garrison duty in Alabama until May 1864; participated in the Atlanta campaign, May 1 – Sept. 8, 1864, including the battles of Resaca, Dallas, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Ezra Chapel and Jonesboro; the march to the sea and Carolina campaign from Nov. 15 through April 1865. Following Joseph E. Johnston’s surrender, the regiment marched to Washington, D.C. where it participated in the Grand Review on May 24, 1865.  The regiment was mustered out on June 6, 1865.

            Mr. Troxel’s obituary (Highland Park Press, Jan. 1, 1914) gives the following details of his life.

            “Obituary – Major Thomas G. Troxel

            The announcement of the death of Thos. G. Troxel on Tuesday morning, December 30th brought real grief to his many friends in this community where he has lived for over 20 years.  Born in Annville, Penn., July 25th, 1844, he moved when a boy with his family to Burlington, Iowa, where most of his youth was spent.  At the age of 18, while attending college in Burlington, he enlisted in the 25th Iowa Infantry Volunteer service and was made 1st sergeant of his company after a few weeks.  He served throughout the last three years of the war, much of the time in command of his company while his surperior [sic] officers were on other details.  He took part in a number of the great battles of the war and made the “march to the sea” with Sherman.  At the end of the war he was in the grand review at Washington, was discharged with the rest of the volunteer troops and went back to Burlington, where he studied law for a year, but the calling of a soldier was more to his taste and he secured a commission in the regular army where he served with honor and distinction from 1866 to 1889 when he retired from physical inability brought on by severe campaigning and an attack of yellow fever contracted in Texas where he was stationed during the troublous times when Texas was under Martial law.

            He had much to do with the building of railroads in the southwest during the hostile Indian days, when it was necessary to give military protection to the railroad engineers.  During the early seventies much of his service was given in frontier stockade posts on the Missouri river.

            His last years of active service were spent in Dakota, Montana and Wyoming, and shortly after his retirement he moved to Highland Park where he lived until his death.  He is survived by his wife, a daughter, Mrs. Dwight Ryther, of the 6th Infantry, and two sons, James and Thomas Troxel.  The funeral services were held at his late residence on East Central Ave. on Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 31st, and interment at Fort Sheridan with military honors.

            Major Troxel was not only a good citizen but had every qualification of the true soldier.  Personally, he was one of the most lovable of men, clean-cut, upright, honest as the sun, with a conscience not blunted by contact with the world, not side-tracked by the stress of business.  He never loved prominence and had a way of self-effacement that was most winning, and with his kind heart and companionable temperment [sic] easily made many friends, especially among the boys and young men by whom he was greatly beloved. Major Troxel leaves a record of loyalty in word and deed and by these very qualities leaves a mark upon his day and generation.”

 

Turnley, Parmenas Taylor

Turnley 9-5-08.jpg

             According to a profile celebrating his 87th birthday (North Shore News-Letter, September 5, 1908), Mr. Turnley served in the U.S. army until 1865.  The full-text of that article follows.

            “Highland Park is wealthy in pioneer citizens.  One of these is Col. P.T. Turnley who was born in East Tennessee.  Sept. 6, 1821 and is therefore 87 years old today.  In 1842 he entered the Military Academy at West Point and in 1846 he graduated in time, to go with his company to Mexico serving his country during the period of the Mexican war and remaining in the U.S. army until the close of the civil war in 1865.  During the many years of service he was frequently engaged in frontier duties which gave him a wide and eventful experience. The privations involved and the labor of that service impaired his health and he resigned the service.

            In 1881 Col. Turnley became a citizen of Highland Park and has taken an active interest in the city ever since.  In April 1886 he was elected Alderman of the first ward and was Mayor of the City from 1888 to 1891 inclusive.

            Col. Turnley is well known for his active interest in public affairs and although as he says he has retired from them it will be remembered that only recently he wrote a vigorous protest against reckless automobile driving.

            At his present great age he is still engaging himself in a work of literary labor.”

A History of Lake County Illinois (Roy S. Bates, 1912) by John J. Halsey notes,

           “Parmenas Taylor Turnley was born September 6, 1821 in Dandride, Tennessee.  In 1846 he was graduated from West Point Military Academy and as a Lieutenant he served through the two years war with Mexico.  From 1849 to 1855 he was on duty in Texas and on the new boundary line between Mexico and the United States, and was then transferred to the general staff in the Quartermaster’s Department.  From 1857 to 1861 he was on duty during the Utah troubles and served in the Civil War until failing health caused him to be placed on the retired list by President Lincoln in 1863.  For five years he was Vice-President of the Trader’s National Bank of Chicago. After the great fire of Chicago in 1871, he spent two years traveling with his family and in 1880 settled in Highland Park where he now lives.  He has been Mayor and Alderman of that city.  He was a member of the Aztec Club which was formed in the City of Mexico by the officers of the army at the close of that war; also a member of the Loyal Legion, Sons of the American Revolution, and other societies.  He was the author of “Turnley’s Narrative from Diaries,” “The Turnleys,” and several other books and many speeches, lectures, and poems. He died in 1911.”

            The Portrait and Biographical Album of Lake County, Illinois (Chicago, 1891) gives these additional details.

            Colonel Parmenas Taylor Turnley, a veteran officer of two wars and the present Mayor of Highland Park, was born in Dandridge, Jefferson County, Tenn., September 6, 1821, and is a son of John C. and Mahala (Taylor) Turnley.  His mother’s father was an uncle of President Zachary Taylor.

            Col. P.T. Turnley was educated at West Point, entering that military school as a cadet in 1842.  On the outbreak of the Mexican War, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant.  After hostilities ceased, he was assigned to duty along the Rio Grande River, on a survey to establish the boundary line between Texas and Mexico.  His military duties included construction of a military road from San Antonio, Texas to Albuquerque, New Mexico, of Forts McIntosh, Duncan, Terrett, Randall, and Crittenden.

            In the spring of 1861, Mr. Turnley, then a Captain, was send to Maryland and Pennsylvania to rebuild a number of railroad bridges.  He occupied the naval station at Annapolis, Maryland, and converted it into an army depot.

            In July 1861, he was ordered to St. Louis under Gen. Fremont, where he established a depot for military supplies and was on duty at that point until February 1862, when he was sent to Cairo, Illinois, by Gen. Halleck to provide transportation for Gen. Grant’s forces and to establish a depot at that place.  In August 1862, Capt. Turnley was ordered to Memphis to establish a military depot.  In September he was granted a six month leave due to ill health during which time he traveled in the Mediterranean.  Upon his return, he found that he had been placed on the retired list.  In January 1865, Maj. Turnley re-entered active service as Quartermaster of the Department of Denver, Colorado.  He retired on January 1, 1866.

            Col. Turnley was married in Chicago in October 1853 to Mary R. Rutter.  They had five children; Emma Gertrude, George H. (died at four years of age), Mamie R., Ernest Seymour [died at seventeen years of age – ed.], and Ethel T.  From 1875 until 1880, Col. Turnley and his family resided in Chicago, since that time they have made their home in Highland Park.

 

Vail, Henry Sherman        

Vail 5-30-08.jpg

           According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, Mr. Vail served inCo. D, 38th Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry.

           The Roster of Wisconsin Volunteers, War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865, lists Mr. Vail’s residence as Avoca at the time he enlisted on March 26, 1864.  He was promoted to corporal, then sergeant.  He mustered out on July 26, 1865.

           This regiment was organized at Madison, Wis. and mustered in April 15, 1864.   It moved to Washington, D.C., May 3-7 and was attached to Casey’s Provisional Brigade, 22nd Army Corps, May 1864; 1st Brigade, 3rdDivision, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September 1864; and 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, to July 1865.

          The 38th was encamped at Arlington, Va., till May 30, 1864 then moved to White House, Va, May 30-June 1.   The battalion was temporarily attached to 1st Minnesota Infantry, a unit famous for its heroic stand on the 2nd day of Gettysburg.  The 38th was assigned to guard the supply train to Cold Harbor, June 9 and took part in the battle of Cold Harbor, June 10-12, 1864.  It participated in the siege of Petersburg, June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865.  It took part in the Mine Explosion attack on Petersburg, July 30, 1864 and a number of smaller battles during late 1864.  The regiment received the Rebel Peace Commissioners Stephens, Hunter, Campbell and Hatch through lines under flag of truce January 29, 1865.   The 38th participated in the Appomattox Campaign, March 28-April 9, the fall of Petersburg April 2 and the pursuit of Confederate General Lee April 3-9, 1865.  Following Lee’s surrender, the regiment was moved to Washington, D. C., April 21-25 and marched in the Grand Review, May 23. The 2nd Battalion mustered out June 6, 1865.  The 1st Battalion was on duty at Arsenal, Washington, during the trial and execution of President Lincoln's assassins and mustered out July 26, 1865.

          An article in the Memorial Day Number of the North Shore News-Letter (May 30, 1908) provides the following details of Mr. Vail’s military service.

        “Mr. Vail was one of our boy soldiers of the Civil War.  He volunteered at the age of 16 in the 38th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He served for two years, passing through the various steps of promotion from a private in the ranks to that of First Sergeant of his own Company.  He was commissioned as Major and Assistant Adj’t General by Governor Hartramft who was his brigade and division General during the War.  He also had a commission from Governor Cullum when governor of Illinois.

         During the Civil War he was engaged with his Company in nine battles.  The rifle which he purchased, when in the service, he still owns and on the stock of it he has had the name of the nine battles engraved.  He was in the last battle of April 7, 1865 at the capture of Petersburg when he captured four Confederates as they were excavating the forts.  He had a button from the coats of each of the four men set in the stock of his gun.

        Mr. Vail is the heir of the name of “Sherman” through four generations, his grandfather being “Henry Sherman” and his grandfather’s grandfather was “Roger Sherman.”  Major Vail is a member of the Waukegan G.A.R.”

            Mr. Vail’s obituary (Highland Park Press, February 20, 1919 - photo) says, “After a brief illness, Major Henry Sherman Vail died February 16, 1919 at the Highland Park Hospital...[Mr. Vail was] born near Janesville, Wisconsin, April 23, 1847, he was the son of James Wellington and Rebecca Austin (Sherman) Vail, and a great-great grandson of Roger Sherman, the signer of the Declaration of Independence.  Major Vail was educated at the grammar schools of Milwaukee and Avoca, Wis., and at Ripon College, Wisconsin [until joining the army].  Mr. Vail married Jennie C. McCulloch of Chicago, March 4th, 1880.  Besides his wife, he leaves four children to survive him: Carleton M., Roger Sherman, Malcolm D., and Cecile Vail Follansbee.  At the age of sixteen, 1863, he enlisted in Co. D, 38thWisconsin, and served as colonel’s orderly, corporal, and first sergeant.  He was appointed major and assistant adjutant general by Gov. Cullom on whose staff he served.”

Mr. Vail lived at 191 Laurel Ave. 

Halsey’s History notes that Mr. Vail came to Chicago in 1872 and entered the life insurance business.  He had lived in Highland Park since 1878.

 

Whalen, Edward 

        “Ed. Whalen, Enlisted May 1862, Ill., 89th Volunteers” is listed in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax. 

         Mr. Whalen was 24 years old and living with his 56-year-old mother, Mary at the time of the 1860 U.S. census.  His birthplace was Canada and he was engaged in farming. 

            According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, he served in Co. C, 89th Illinois Infantry.  Thomas Marony and David O’Brien (listed above) also enlisted in this company.  Unlike his comrades, Mr. Whalen survived the war.  He mustered in on August 27, 1862 and mustered out on June 10, 1865.

            The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database noted that Edward Whalen held the rank of private.  He was 23 years old, 5’10” tall, had brown hair, blue eyes, and a light complexion.  He was unmarried.  His occupation was listed as laborer and his birthplace, Ireland.  He enlisted for a three year term of service on August 9, 1862 and mustered in on August 27, 1862 at Chicago.  He mustered out on June 10, 1865 at Nashville, Tennessee.

            Please refer to the entry under Thomas Marony for a history of the regiment through July 1864.  The regiment was involved in the siege of Atlanta from July 22-August 25, 1864 the battle of Jonesboro from August 31-September 1, and Lovejoy Station from September 2-6. It participated in operations against Confederate General Hood in North Alabama and North Georgia from September 29-November 3 and in the Nashville campaign during November and December including the battle of Franklin on November 30 and the battle of Nashville on December 15-16, 1864.  Regimental losses at the battle of Nashville were 39 men killed, wounded or taken prisoner.   In 1864, 440 recruits were added to the regiment, making a total of 1,403 who served in the 89th.  Of that number, 820 were killed, died from wounds or were discharged on account of disability.  The principal losses were at Stone’s River where 142 were killed, wounded or taken prisoner, Chickamauga where 109 men were lost and the siege of Atlanta where the regiment lost 211 men.  

 

White, William

          “Wm. White” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax. 

          Library staff has been unable to verify military service for a William White from Lake County, Illinois.

          Mr. White’s obituary (North Shore News-Letter, April 1, 1910) states that he “was one of the oldest and best known contractors in Chicago, who had retired from business ten years before his death and made his home in Highland Park.  He died at St. Lukes Hospital after a lingering illness.  The funeral services were held at Gordon’s Chapel.  The Masonic Lodge of which Mr. White was a member, had charge of the funeral arrangements and escorted the remains to Rose Hill where they were laid to rest.  With the death of Mr. White, Highland Park loses one of its most public spirited citizens.  The large fountain on Central avenue will be remembered as the gift of Mr. White.”

 

Yaeger, Victor

         “Mr. Yager” is listed as a Civil War veteran in Notes on History of Highland Park Illinois (1920) by Evva Egan Truax. 

         The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database lists Victor Yeager was a private in Company A, 13th Illinois Cavalry Consolidated.  He was discharged due to disability on June 21, 1864.  On August 9, 1890 his widow, Barbara, applied for a pension.

        According to the National Park Service’s Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System database, Victor Yeager [Jaeger] enlisted on October 28, 1861 in Company A of the Illinois 13th Cavalry.  He was mustered in on December 31, 1861.

        Victor Jaeger arrived in the United States from Germany on July 19, 1852.