New Books for 5th Graders

Snakes by Nic Bishop

Reading Level: Grades 1 and up. Not recommended for gerbilsssss or thosssssse ssssenssssitive to sssssslithererssssss.

Nic Bishop, one of the most terrifying authors in children's literature today, has done it again with his new book, Snakes. Prepare for sleepless, terrified nights after these horrific photographs of larger-than-life serpents (really, Nic? Did they have to be larger? Actual size is horrifying enough!). We gerbils hear a lot of kids talk about how scary R.L. Stine's books are (they are located right next to our cage) but clearly these kids have never read anything by Nic Bishop. He's the scariest there is!

 

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Look for more [terrifying] books by Nic Bishop.

Bomb: The Race to Build-and Steal-the World's Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin

Reading Level: Grades 5 and up

Bomb  reads like an edge-of -your- seat spy novel, but it's all true.  It tells of  the Herculean effort behind building the bomb, the desperate arms race with Germany that will decide WWII,  the heroic efforts of Norwegein resistance fighters, and  the spies determined to steal the plans for the Soviet Union.  The story of the scientific genius behind the bomb,  the politics, the military heroics, and the espionage make this a thrilling read where truth is far more exciting than fiction.

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Other books by Steve Sheinkin

Dark Lord, The Early Years by Jamie Thomson

Reading Level: Grades 5-7

The Dark Lord, Master of the Legions of Dread, Sorcerer Supreme and Lord of the Darklands is confused.  One moment he was leading his legions against the White Wizard Hasdruban the Pure and the next he is falling out of his world into a strange land where he is trapped in the body of a puny human.  

The stunned Dark Lord can barely talk or move, he is whisked  away in a strange screaming conveyance to a steel citadel where he is questioned by humans who, mistaking his clear answer that his name is “Dark Lord," dub him Dirk Lloyd and send him to a foster home.

Christopher Purejoie is perfectly happy as an only child.  He certainly never asked for a foster brother….especially not a crazy one.  Chris does have to admit that Dirk is funny, like when Dirk marches into 7th grade English and announces to Mrs. Batelakes, “I am the Great Lord Dirk, you may call me master!”

So who is Dirk Lloyd?  A delusional child who needs intensive psychiatric treatment? A smart-mouthed trouble maker who needs to be straightened out by Principal Grousammer?  A funny kid who disrupts classes every day? Or an exiled villian desperate to return to his powers?

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Books by Jamie Thomson

For more reading on the dark side try:

The Cloak Society by Jeremy Kraatz

The Vindico by Wesley King and

Evil Genius by Catherine Jinks

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